All posts by marinape

Final Pitch

For my final project, I want to explore why the area of MacArthur Park has become a hub for immigrants, especially Latin American immigrants. According to census data, thirty-five percent of Los Angeles County is now foreign-born. I want to talk about the different conveniences Spanish-speaking immigrants have in MacArthur Park that may be attracting to them to gather around the area. For instance, the fact that there are restaurants, book stores and other shops that employ Spanish speakers and also produce the products they are looking for. I would also want to talk about the culture that is seen around in the area, particularly in regards to Latin music, immigrant festivals,Catholic gatherings and history of the area. Lastly, I would like to touch on the surrounding immigrant organizations such as CARECEN and other that exist in the area to help assist immigrants with any concerns they may have.

To sum it up, I want to explain why MacArthur Park has become a hub for Latin American immigrants through three different lenses:

-Commercial conveniences (bookstores, restaurants, fake ID places and other shops where spanish is the language of choice)

-Culture (Latin music, festivals, Catholic churches, history)

-Non-profits helping immigrants (CARECEN)

My sources for this project would be employees or customers at Bibi’s Cafe and other restaurants, the manager of the only spanish book store in MacArthur Park, a pastor of an outdoor church gathering held in MacArthur Park, MacArthur Park historian, advisors/lawyers at CARECEN.

For my multimedia element, I would like to include vinyettes with audio and photographs of different MacArthur Park residents telling me whether or not they think that MacArthur Park is an ideal hub for immigrants. I would have them explain to me why or why not. I would also want to include a timeline with some of the important immigration history of MacArthur Park, showcasing important dates when laws were passed or events were held.

Sophie Flay Digital Footprint

I did my digital footprint assignment on Sophie Flay. I found accounts and content for Sophie on most of the traditional social media sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, YouTube and Flickr. Her name is prominent on both Google and other search engines.

When I initially looked up her name on Google, I found a number of articles, photos and YouTube videos with her father Bobby Flay, the celebrity chef on the Food Network. The articles were from tabloid type sites and in list format. One of the articles is called “11 things to know about Bobby Flay’s daughter” and it delves into Sophie’s personal life. The photos were with her dad at different events such as a Hollywood Walk of Fame proceeding where her dad was being honored. You can also find photos of that event on Flickr. On YouTube, I found videos where she is seen cooking with her dad on his show, but also her work for Annenberg’s The Buzz and her singing for USC’s a cappella group The Sirens.

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While Sophie appears to lead a public life, her personal social media accounts are more private. The only reason I found Sophie on Facebook is because we have mutual friends. Her name on Facebook is under a pseudonym Sophie Catherine. On it she shares photos about her sorority, friends, family and anything on social media she finds interesting or comedic. Additionally, on Instagram, Sophie shares photos with friends and family.  Everything she makes public is appropriate and therefore she wouldn’t have anything to worry about with employers.

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Sophie’s presence on Twitter is more subdued. She recently joined Twitter in August and has been posting about the presidential debates. One of her posts is a soundbite of Hillary Clinton that she retweeted. If you search her name on Twitter, however, you are also able to find tweets of the work she has done with her father on the Food Network. Everything she posts is relevant and suitable for Twitter.

Her professional account on LinkedIn is simple and to the point. She describes that she is a USC student along with her different internships for NBC Sports, Dash Radio and Spotify. On USC Annenberg Media, you are able to see Sophie’s experience in journalism with Annenberg’s show The Buzz and the USC-related articles she has written.  

Overall, even though there is a significant amount of content on Sophie throughout all of these sites, none of it is alarming. Everything is well presented, classy and fun. I think that it is great that she does have a pseudonym on Facebook, so that she can keep her life a bit more private.

Photography and GIF-Marina Peña

Ant POV: MacArthur Park, located in Westlake in Los Angeles, has a rich history dating back to the nineteenth century. In the 1890s, it was a vacation spot surrounded by luxurious hotels. Later on in the 1980s, it became a hot spot for gang-related violence. The center piece of the park is a lake with a fountain and ducks swimming around.
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Red: At the park I met Armando Romero, a 65-year-old native from Guadalajara, Mexico. He told me that he works in maintenance in Rancho Dominguez, but has been coming to MacArthur Park for the past 45 years “para relajar” (to relax).
Eyes: Romero told me his eyes surely looked tired from the day's work, but to go ahead and take my best shot. He was waiting for his grandson who was playing soccer close by.
Eyes: Romero told me his eyes surely looked tired from the day’s work, but to go ahead and take my best shot. He was waiting for his grandson who was playing soccer close by.
Hands: Romero told me that you can tell how much a man has worked in his life by taking a look at the condition of his hands.
Hands: Romero told me that you can tell how much a man has worked in his life by taking a look at the condition of his hands.
Action: Romero pointed out his 11-year-old grandson Juan Romero to me as he was playing soccer. Romero told me that it was important to have his grandson exercise every day.
Action: Romero pointed out his 11-year-old grandson Juan Romero to me as he was playing soccer. Romero told me that it was important to have his grandson exercise every day.
WTF: As I looked around where Romero was sitting, I saw this Clocktower monument with four surrounding balls. Both Romero and I didn't know what to think of the piece. Later, I found out the piece is by artist George Herms, who is known for making assemblages out of rusty and discarded objects.
WTF: As I looked around where Romero was sitting, I saw this Clocktower monument with four surrounding balls. Both Romero and I didn’t know what to think of the piece. Later, I found out the piece is by artist George Herms, who is known for making assemblages out of rusty and discarded objects.
Delicious: Romero told me that his favorite restaurant was a traditional Honduran restaurant named Bibi's Cafe, which was right across from MacArthur Park. His favorite dish is baleadas (featured here), which is composed of a flour tortilla with meat inside.
Delicious: Romero told me that his favorite restaurant in the area is a traditional Honduran restaurant named Bibi’s Cafe, which was right across from MacArthur Park. His favorite dish is baleadas (featured here), which is composed of a flour tortilla with meat inside.
Delicious: Another one of Romero's favorites from Bibi's Cafe: pescado frito.
Delicious: Another one of Romero’s favorites from Bibi’s Cafe: pescado frito.
Ant POV: The ducks at the lake of MacArthur Park were the uniting factor for the the people that were there. They were all partaking in feeding the ducks when I arrived and when I left.
Ant POV: Throughout my conversation with Romero, I observed that the ducks at the lake of MacArthur Park were the uniting factor for the the people that were there. They were all partaking in feeding the ducks when I arrived and when I left.
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GIF: These ducks are called mallards and they mostly feed on plants on the water’s surface. Throughout my entire visit to MacArthur Park, kids and adults were feeding the ducks. They were as much a part of the community as the people. The ducks united the people around a single activity: feeding them. I thought it was neat to see the camaraderie the ducks brought. They are essential to MacArthur Park’s aesthetic.